Loving you for your Faults

There are very few organizations out there who actually get (and honor) the distinct difference between filling a position for sake of filling it and filling a position for the sake of advancing the company’s cause. It’s partially why most organizations have a perpetually revolving door. It doesn’t matter how good your organization is at keeping your people engaged. If they are the wrong people to begin with, they are bound to leave eventually. It’s no different than why many marriages eventually fail…those supposed lovebirds should never have been a couple in the first place.

Who’s to blame? We all have a hand in this – HR, the hiring managers, the recruiters, even the recruits. People get attracted to the wrong things and they end up over valuing that attraction in the equation…it’s human nature. And it therefore turns out that the “best” candidate is not always the “right” candidate. Organizations have tried everything under the sun to get to the “right” candidate. Applicant Tracking Systems with their silly little filter questions, candidate screening surveys, psychological assessments, interview upon interview upon interview. Do they help? Well, it’s better than nothing…sometimes. But I think we’re missing something really important here. And it’s a theme you’ll read time and again on this blog…

TRANSPARENCY

We spend far too much time trying to pick the right candidate than we do helping the candidate pick the right company. To reverse this trend, we need to get comfortable sharing some information during the recruiting process that we ordinarily hoard for ourselves. Stop with the shiny, fluffy, little brochures. Why not give them the hard stuff like:

  • Average weekly hours worked in the department
  • Number of promotions in the last year
  • Average manager tenure/average executive tenure
  • Turnover rates by department, by company
  • 5-Year trend in Healthcare Premium inflation/deflation
  • The hiring manager’s most recent multi-source feedback results (summarized)
  • 5-Year trend in base salary increases
  • Ethnic, gender, and age demographics
  • 401(k) plan performance
  • $’s spent on employee professional development every year
  • Exit survey results…key reasons people leave the organization
  • Number of company-wide meetings and celebrations every year
  • Let them talk to others in the department not necessarily complicit in the hiring decision
  • Examples of company-wide communications, newsletters…hell, give them access to your intranet site?!?

Yep, some of this stuff will scare your “best” candidates away. But at least there’s no bait and switch in play. Enlighten them while you can – you’ll end up filtering through those candidates who ultimately would have woken up only to realize they were in the wrong place. Just go after the candidates who want to sign-on because they love you despite your faults.

Photo Credit: Responsible Lending

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One Response to Loving you for your Faults
  1. Ian
    September 22, 2010 | 8:01 pm

    I commend you for writing your post because hiring managers think you need to keep the bad stuff a secret. I accepted a position and the manager did not tell me that I would be working extensive hours and that I would be acting as an administrative assistant. I was miserable and actively continued searching for new work after only a month.

    I hope hiring managers learn to overcome this challenge.
    Ian´s last blog ..Mentoring in tough timesMy ComLuv Profile

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